5 Ways to Maintain Baby’s Sleep Schedule While Traveling

If baby’s not happy, nobody’s happy. Use these tips to keep your little one rested and in a good mood on your next trip.

Traveling with your baby or young child can be challenging, especially when it comes to keeping his or her naptime and bedtime routines. Getting good rest is the key to keeping your little one in a good mood when you are away from home, so keep these five tips in mind if you are thinking about traveling in the near future:

  1. Keep baby feeling safe and secure by following the same naptime and bedtime routine that you do at home. Bring along her favorite books, toys and blankets, especially those that she associates with napping and bedtime.
  2. When possible, try to include lots of outdoor activities during the day, but stay close to home (that is, where you are staying) in the evening to help your baby wind down and fall asleep for the night.
  3. Buy a good travel crib. Investing in a sturdy travel crib that offers good support and a comfortable mattress will pay off in better rest for baby—and for you.
  4. Bring along a source of soothing background noise

Dieting Hints and Tips Weight Loss Resources

There are many reasons for people who are overweight to want to lose weight. Is it to be healthier, to look better. to feel better, and/or to have more energy. Whatever your reason is, you need to lose at a slow and steady rate for best results. A safe and healthy rate is no more than two (2) pounds per week. This is the goal you should aim for in your weight loss program.

Lose 1 pound per week – Reduce your weekly intake of calories by 3,500 calories (3,500 divided by 7 days equals 500 calories per day).

Lose 2 pounds per week – Reduce your weekly intake of calories by 7,000 calories (7,000 calories divided by 7 days equals 1,000 calories per day).

It is very simple logic – To cut out either the 500 or 1,00 calories a day, you can either eat less calories or burn more calories by exercising. Or, to make it an easier goal to achieve, try a combination of eating fewer calories, and burning more calories more a day by exercising.

10 steps to a healthy pregnancy

Pregnancy is an ideal time to start taking really good care of yourself both physically and emotionally. If you follow the few simple guidelines below, you should give yourself the best chance of having a problem-free pregnancy and a healthy baby.

1. See your doctor or midwife as soon as possible

As soon as you find out you’re pregnant, get in touch with your GP or a midwife to organise your antenatal care. Organising your care early means you’ll get good advice for a healthy pregnancy right from the start. You’ll also have plenty of time to organise any ultrasound scans and tests that you may need.

2. Eat well

Aim to eat a healthy, balanced diet whenever you can. Try to have:

  • At least five portions of fruit and vegetables daily.
  • Plenty of carbohydrates, such as bread, pasta and rice, as the basis of your meals. Choose wholegrain carbohydrates rather than white, so you get plenty of fibre.
  • Daily servings of protein, such as fish, lean meat, eggs, nuts or pulses, and some milk and dairy foods.
  • Two portions of fish a week, at least one of which should be oily. Fish is packed with protein, vitamin D,

The Down Syndrome Diagnosis What to Expect after Delivery

It may not be the path you envisioned, but knowing what to expect will give you the confidence to parent a child with Down syndrome

Receiving a prenatal Down syndrome diagnosis can feel overwhelming. While most expectant parents worry about which breast pump to use and which diapers to buy, you will concentrate on what to expect when caring for a baby with Down syndrome.

First, repeat the Boy Scout motto,”Be Prepared,” to yourself about 10 to 20 times. This should become your family’s go-to saying and your key to gliding through the early months. Being prepared and knowing what to expect will give you the confidence you’ll need to parent a child with Down syndrome more easily.

First Appearances

Have you ever held a baby with Down syndrome before? If not, you have a lot to look forward to! Spending time with one of these little cherubs is such a special experience. According to the National Down Syndrome Society, babies with Down syndrome often share a specific and differentiated set of physical characteristics, which include:

  • Almond-shaped eyes
  • Small noses
  • A round face with a slightly flat profile
  • Hyperextending joints
  • Muscle tone deficiency
  • Larger gap

Eating tips for children babies

ccccBabies grow quickly in the first year of life, so they need plenty of energy (kilo joules) and nutrients. A child’s growth isn’t always steady and even, which means that appetite and hunger can be unpredictable.

The amounts of foods eaten by your baby and their interest in food may be a little different from day to day. This is normal and shouldn’t cause any concerns if your baby is growing well.

Introduce solids at about six months of age

Breast milk is an important food for babies until at least 12 months of age, or longer if the mum and baby desire. Infant formula is important until 12 months. By about six months of age, a baby’s iron stores are low and extra foods will be needed to maintain healthy growth and prevent nutritional problems such as iron deficiency. Start to introduce solids around six months of age – when your baby starts showing interest in food.

Clues that your baby is ready for solids

When your baby starts to need the nutrients that

Sticked

Tips for Your First Trimester

OK, now that you’ve calmed down some from the initial excitement, wiped out the pregnancy shelf at your local bookstore, and made a down payment on a new maternity wardrobe, it’s time to focus on the most important thing here (and no, it’s not the wallpaper pattern for the nursery): your health and the baby’s health. Your first assignment: Pick up the phone and call your doctor, nurse practitioner, or midwife—whomever you plan to see throughout your pregnancy and delivery—and make an appointment. It’s time to begin prenatal care.

HOW ARE YOU FEELING? 4 Weeks Pregnant Symptoms

Studies find that babies of mothers who don’t get prenatal care are three times more likely to have a low birth weight and five times more likely to die than babies born to mothers who do get care. Need any better reason?

The First Visit and Beyond

In a normal pregnancy, you will see your health care professional every month until about the sixth month; then every two weeks during the seventh and eighth months, and then weekly until labor.

During the first visit, your health

Healthy eating tips

A healthy diet should include a wide variety of nutritious foods for sufficient intake of all nutrients, including vitamins and minerals. Foods to include are breads, pastas, lean meats, fish, fruits and vegetables. A healthy diet can help you maintain a healthy body weight and decrease your risk of many diet-related chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and some cancers.

Healthy diets contain a variety of foods

In general, we should include a range of nutritious foods and eat:

  • plenty of breads and cereals (particularly wholegrain), fruit, vegetables and legumes (such as chickpeas, lentils and red kidney beans)
  • low-salt foods, and use salt sparingly
  • small amounts of foods that contain added sugars
  • reduced-fat milk and other dairy products.

It is also important to drink an adequate amount of water.

Physical activity and healthy eating

A good balance between exercise and food intake is important, as this helps to maintain muscle strength and a healthy body weight. At least 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity, such as walking, is recommended every day

Keep fat to a minimum

Adult diets should be low in fat, especially saturated fat. Saturated fat, which is the main fat in animal products, fried foods, chocolate, cakes and